AIP sets date for New Future of Flexible Packaging half-day training course

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) have announced that they have introduced a NEW Future of Flexible Packaging Half-Day Training Course to the educational portfolio with the 28th of August being the first course date scheduled.

Overview of Course
One of the fastest growing segments of the packaging industry, flexible packaging combines the best qualities of plastic, film, paper and aluminium foil to deliver a broad range of protective properties while employing a minimum of material. Typically taking the shape of a bag, pouch, liner, or overwrap, flexible packaging is defined as any package or any part of a package whose shape can be readily changed.

Leading the way in packaging innovation, flexible packaging adds value and marketability to food and non-food products alike. From ensuring food safety and extending shelf life, to providing even heating, barrier protection, ease of use, resealability and superb printability, the industry continues to advance at an unprecedented rate.

The life cycle attributes of flexible packaging demonstrate many sustainable advantages. Innovation and technology have enabled flexible packaging manufacturers to use fewer natural resources in the creation of their packaging, and improvements in production processes have reduced water and energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions and volatile organic compounds.

The Future of Flexible Packaging half-day training course will cover the basic fundamentals of flexible packaging, its benefits, how you chose the specific structures to match the product, its performance, marketing challenges and how the packaging is manufactured.

With the latest challenges facing us regarding sustainability in packaging the course will discuss the options, pros and cons of Compostability vs Recyclability and other alternative materials now available. As an add on, the course will be looking at the future plans for flexible packaging and available recycling options to meet the 2025 National Packaging Targets.

Course Objectives:
The objectives of the course are to provide participants an understanding of:

  • A good broad understanding of the benefits of Flexible packaging.
  • The process of manufacturing.
  • Where the future lies with flexible films and the changes ahead.
  • Snapshot of some of the latest packaging trends and what are the driving forces.
  • Understanding the challenges facing us with the sustainable packaging race toward 2025.

 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Packaging Technologists and Designers, Product developers, marketing personal, technical and production staff using packaging, sales and marketing reps who want a crash course on all things ‘Flexible’.

AIP/APCO course looks at National Packaging Targets

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in partnership with APCO has developed a new training course ‘Tools to help you meet the 2025 National Packaging Targets: PREP & ARL’ with the first two course dates set for July and August. The  course will also include a tour of a Materials Recycling Facility (MRF).

Objectives of course:

  • Is your business doing enough to ensure that 100 per cent of your packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025?
  • Have you audited your current packaging for recyclability?
  • Have you started using the Packaging Recyclability Evaluation Portal (PREP) during your design process?
  • Are you looking for a way to validate your on-pack recyclability labelling?
  • If a consumer picked up your product, would they easily understand which bin to put it in?
  • Are you shifting your packaging design to incorporate the Australasian Recycling Label (ARL)?

If you answered no to any of these questions, then this training course is for you.

This training course will help attendees to better understand what tools are available, how to use them, why they are needed and how they link to the 2025 National Packaging Targets.

The APCO Packaging Recycling Label Program is a nation-wide labelling program that provides designers and brand owners with the tools to inform responsible packaging design and helps consumers to understand how to correctly dispose of packaging. Led by the Australian Packaging Covenant (APCO), in collaboration with Planet Ark and PREP Design, the program aims to increase recycling rates, educate consumers and contribute to cleaner recycling streams. The two elements of the program are the Packaging Recyclability Evaluation Portal (PREP) and the Australasian Recycling Label (ARL).

Tool 1: PREP
PREP provides a way for brand owners, manufacturers and designers to assess whether an item of packaging could be classified as ‘recyclable’ through kerbside collection in Australian and New Zealand. PREP produces a report for each ‘project’ that is evaluated. A project will list the recyclability classification for each ‘separable component’ plus the user may nominate a scenario where the separable components are joined at the time of disposal (e.g. bottle and cap). Combining technical recyclability and collection coverage, PREP provides the evidence base for applying the Australasian Recycling Label on-pack.

Tool 2: ARL
The ARL is an evidence-based, standardised labelling system that provides clear and consistent on-pack recycling information to inform consumers of the correct disposal method. The ARL is designed to be used in conjunction with PREP, which informs the user of the correct on-pack ARL artwork for each ‘separable component’ of packaging. It is a simple and effective method to improve consumer recycling behaviours.

This course will help attendees understand how to more accurately use PREP and the ARL including:

  • How to complete a PREP evaluation
  • How to convert PREP outcomes to an ARL artwork
  • How to apply the ARL on-pack correctly

Attendees will start the training course by visiting a Materials Recycling Facility to obtain a realistic view of the current recycling capabilities in Australia. Moving then into the classroom, you will learn about the APCO Recycling Label Program and consumer recycling behaviours. Attendees will then deep-dive in to the purpose of PREP, gain an understanding of the governance and data collection process behind PREP, review samples and material templates and work through sample assessment templates. Attendees will be able to undertake a hands-on interactive session using PREP to complete an evaluation, review a report and understand the reasons behind the assessment.

Course objectives:
This half-day training course will enable participants to gain a better understanding of how using PREP and applying the ARL can help your business to meet the 2025 National Packaging Targets. The course will also enable participants to have a better and more realistic view of what packaging is truly recyclable and being recycled in Australia. Understanding these tools will enable agencies and marketers to provide verifiable and consistent recyclability information to their consumers.

How innovators save food through sustainable packaging

One of the key objectives of the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), outside of providing the industry with professional packaging education and training, is to continually shine the light on individuals and companies who are making a significant difference in their field of packaging. Recognising innovation and unique packaging development is important to the AIP as we believe that it not only acknowledges inspiring individuals and teams, but also encourages others to be innovative.

Sadly, packaging technologists and designers often go unrecognised within their business and establishing the Australasian Packaging Innovation & Design Awards (PIDA) is an external peer-reviewed and deserved industry recognition.

The PIDA Awards have been designed to recognise companies and individuals who are making a significant difference in their field across Australia and New Zealand and are coordinated by the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) and Packaging New Zealand.

A feature of the PIDA Awards is that they are the exclusive feeder program for the prestigious WorldStar Packaging Awards and provide an opportunity for Australian and New Zealand companies to also be recognised on an international packaging platform. The 2019 PIDA winners, for example, will automatically be eligible for entry into the 2020 WorldStar Packaging Awards competition which will be held alongside the largest packaging exhibition in the world Interpack in Germany.

Within the 13 award categories, there are a number of special awards that are focussed on encouraging packaging technologists to consider the issues of accessible packaging, sustainable packaging and save food packaging as everyday criteria for their packaging development.

With all of the discussions focussed on fighting food waste, and the role of packaging in minimising food waste, it is important that the industry recognises and awards companies who are working in this design area and trying to make a difference. The Save Food Packaging Design Special Award is designed to recognise companies that have developed innovative and sustainable packaging solutions that minimise food losses and food waste, extend shelf life and improve the supply of food.

A key component of the Save Food Packaging Design Special Award is to raise the profile of the critical role of packaging to reduce food waste and therefore, reduce product’s overall environmental impact. Avoiding food waste is a critical packaging issue and one that food producers, manufacturers, brand owners, retailers and consumers need to better understand. While the primary function of packaging is to protect the contents, the function of packaging to reduce food waste is rarely discussed. The connection between packaging design and food waste needs to be discussed more openly in the industry. From field to fork, there are a number of possibilities for food loss and waste to occur. It has been approximated that up to one-third of the edible food produced does not reach the fork and packaging a role to play to minimise food waste.

Opportunities for packaging design to reduce or eliminate food waste can include better facilitation or communication around portioning, expiry date/best before extensions, or better clarification and even leftover storage solutions. The packaging should also highlight a range of design factors that help to prevent food waste including mechanical protection, physical-chemical protection, resealability, easy to open, grip, dose and empty, contains the correct quantity and serving size, food safety/freshness information, expiry date and “Best before” date, information on storage options and improved communication on packs including open, reseal, close and dispense. The packaging should also facilitate sorting of household waste – easy to clean, separate, recycle or reuse.

The 2019 Save Food Packaging Design Special Award Finalists are Hazeldene’s Chicken Farm and Sealed Air for Cryovac Darfresh on Tray vacuum skin technology, Plantic Technologies for the Plantic RV Material that was designed for Moana seafood company and Flavour Creations for their pre-thickened Ready-to-drink (RTDs) new Dysphagia Cup and Cup Holder.

Hazeldene’s Chicken Farm and Sealed Air have been recognised for Cryovac Darfresh on Tray vacuum skin technology that has been engineered to address food safety, 25 per cent extension of shelf life over the previously used Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) format and improved on-pack communication. The Hazeldene design project had included a range of design factors to reduce food waste and included the tear tap peelable top film allows for easy access to the product. The top film is tough enough to withstand possible bone puncture marks, with the serving size optimised for two people. The skin packaging format allows the pack to be frozen and thawed without product degradation and “best before” date is clearly shown on the packaging.

Plantic Technologies have been recognised for the Plantic RV Material that was designed for Moana seafood company to be able to supply fresh fish to the online meal delivery company “My Food Bag”. The fish had to be protected to maintain freshness for home deliveries, extend the shelf life of fresh fish from the day that the fish were caught and packed until delivery to warehouse to provide Moana with greater flexibility in their production.

Flavour Creations has been recognised for their pre-thickened ready-to-drink (RTDs) which are a shelf-stable product with 12 months shelf-life when unopened and best before dates are clearly legible, When the RTD’s are packaged in the new dysphagia cup and cup holder they are designed to reduce food wastage by enabling better motor control of the drinking process, improving grip, stability and ensuring the ability to consume the full contents.”

The AIP has Best-Practice examples to showcase what true and innovative Save Food Packaging Design really looks like to help guide others. The AIP has spent the last four years developing Save Food Packaging Design guidelines that have been the foundation of the award category judging. These guidelines enable the judges to provide feedback and areas of improvement to the entrants so that they can ensure that all of the criteria are met to successfully market their packaging as unique for saving food. The long-term goal is that all Food Packaging Technologists and Designers incorporate Save Food Design guidelines as a standard practice into their NPD process. Every food manufacturer has a role to play in minimising food waste and it can start with your packaging design.

Future of Soft Plastics Technical event Part II

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) is pleased to advise that due to popular demand and the recent success of the Future of Soft Plastics Technical event that was held in Victoria, a lunch time version will be held on the 17 of July in New South Wales and all of industry is invited to attend.

The AIP, along with their many industry members, are concerned about current discussions and challenges directed at ‘single use plastic’ packaging and this technical seminar will help to guide you and your teams to better understand the current and true state-of-play with Soft Plastics in Australia.

Discussions will include understanding the issues surrounding Soft Plastics and the important benefits this packaging format brings (food safety, convenience and reducing food waste). Speakers will provide insights into some of the excellent initiatives that are already underway in the country to effectively recycle this packaging format.

This technical seminar will focus on soft plastics and the current recycling programs being undertaken and the evening is aimed at challenging the industry to be more involved in promoting a better understanding of the benefits and opportunities for soft plastics.

Speakers will include: Caitlyn Richards, Responsible Sourcing Manager, Sustainable Products and Packaging, Coles Group, Peter Tamblyn, Sales & Marketing Manager Asia Pacific, Close the Loop, Mark Jacobson, Marketing Director, Replas, Anthony Peyton MAIP, Director, PREP Design and Keith Chessell, AIP Board Member, APCO

AIP Members pack 2175kgs of potatoes and carrots for KiwHarvest

As a part of the Australian Institute of Packaging’s commitment to Fighting Food Waste two teams of Members headed to KiwiHarvest in Auckland, NZ over the last month to help pack 2175 kgs of potatoes and carrots into approx. 145x 15kg bags. The bags KiwiHarvest use are the malt bags from boutique breweries which saves them from going to waste as well.

The recipients who receive the potatoes and carrots are all over Auckland from Orewa in the North to Pukekohe in the South. The completed bags are given to foodbanks to distribute to individual families, used for community meals such as Everybody Eats, charities like Shine Womens Refuge, schools.

So who are KiwiHarvest?
KiwiHarvest are New Zealand’s perishable food rescuers; collecting good food before it goes to waste and distributing it to those in need to nourish the wider community. Every month they deliver over 60,000 kgs of food to 220 charities nationally. Their work is already changing the fact that 103,000 tonnes of food is thrown away by New Zealand industry every year. KiwiHarvest is here to create lasting positive change so that good food does not go to waste. Moreover, those that need nourishment will receive it. KiwiHarvest reduces the negative impacts of food waste on our environment by redistributing excess food; helping to create lasting positive social change by nourishing those in need.

So how can AIP Members and industry colleagues help KiwiHarvest?
Join our AIP KiwiHarvest Volunteer Program; either as an individual, with your staff and colleagues, or even with your families. The AIP will work directly with KiwiHarvest to book in some days where our volunteers can visit the Ellerslie Warehouse and help pick and pack fresh vegetables into sacks. The day will start with a formal introduction on how KiwiHarvest works and information on their charity partners. The AIP will be offering more volunteer days throughout the year for NZ industry.

AIP supports Certified Packaging Professional roll out

As the peak professional body for packaging education and training in Australasia it is paramount that the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) offers professional designations that are internationally recognised and have the ability to raise the profession of packaging technologists and designers across the globe. Such a designation is the CPP; which is a registered trademark of the Institute of Packaging Professionals (IoPP) in the United States.
Since 1972, IoPP has awarded over 2000 qualified applicants the designation Certified Packaging Professional (CPP) and is recognised as the premier designation in the industry signifying excellence as a packaging professional.

Candidates achieve the CPP designation by demonstrating industry expertise and experience, measured through a flexible applicant testing process.

Attaining the CPP recognises the designation as a commitment to excellence in the packaging profession and the credential demonstrates that a packaging practitioner possesses packaging knowledge, experience and skills to the degree that they deserve recognition as a true packaging professional. CPP’s are in demand
as speakers and as leaders on packaging teams.

Approximately three years ago, the AIP approached the IoPP about the possibility of rolling out the CPP program into Australia. Since then, the AIP announced that the region has 20 certified packaging professionals, with enrolments coming in every week from across Australia, New Zealand and Asia.

As a member country of the World Packaging Organisation (WPO), the AIP recently agreed to provide support for CPP program roll outs for other countries across the globe. This has been to ensure that the CPP designation and the packaging profession is recognised globally. WPO member countries that are in the process of the rollout include Nigeria, Brazil, South Africa and Singapore with many others to follow shortly.

The CPP designation is now internationally recognised by several organisations including the IoPP, the AIP and the WPO.

By encouraging other countries to roll out the CPP program the aim is to see packaging technology and design become more globally recognised as a profession, which in turn will encourage more people to attain greater packaging skills and knowledge.

The flow-on effect will be more people developing long-term careers in packaging across the globe.

The CPP designation should also assist companies to recognise and employ highly skilled packaging professionals through various means including international transfers and exchange programs.

Attaining the CPP designation is an excellent investment in a packaging professional’s development and the credential defines the packaging professional, allowing organisations to seek out and hire the right professional based on verified knowledge, skills and industry contributions.

In an ideal world, all companies who are hiring packaging professionals should ensure that the CPP designation is a recognised and required skill-set for the hiring and promotion processes.

The CPP is the premier designation in the industry, signifying excellence as a packaging professional.

The most recent IoPP salary survey has revealed that CPPs earn anywhere between seven per cent and 10 per cent more than their co-workers who don’t have the certification.
Using the CPP program to assess and evaluate one’s professional competency will validate the person as internationally proficient as a packaging professional.

Nerida Kelton MAIP
Executive Director – Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP)
ANZ Board Member – World Packaging Organisation (WPO)

The future of soft plastics to be discussed

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with SPE, will be running a technical dinner to discuss the Future of Soft Plastics on the 8 May in Melbourne and all of industry is invited to attend.

Both the AIP and the SPE, along with their many industry members, are concerned about current discussions and challenges directed at ‘single use plastic’ packaging and this dinner will help to guide you and your teams to better understand the current and true state-of-play with Soft Plastics in Australia.

Discussions will include understanding the issues surrounding Soft Plastics and the important benefits this packaging format brings (food safety, convenience and reducing food waste).  Speakers will provide insights into some of the excellent initiatives that are already underway in the country to effectively recycle this packaging format.

This technical dinner will focus on soft plastics and the current recycling programs being undertaken and the evening is aimed at challenging the industry to be more involved in promoting a better understanding of the benefits and opportunities for soft plastics.

Speakers will include: Fiona Baxter, group manager responsible sourcing, Coles; Peter Tamblyn, sales and marketing manager Asia Pacific, Close the Loop; Mark Jacobson, marketing director, Replas; Elizabeth Kasell, director of development, REDCycle; and Anthony Peyton MAIP, Director, PREP Design.

Packaging awards entries close this Friday

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) and Packaging New Zealand, are pleased to advise that submissions are closing on the 8 of March for the 2019 Packaging Innovation & Design Awards (PIDA), which recognise companies and individuals who are making a significant difference in their field in Australia and New Zealand.

The Design Innovation of the Year company awards will recognise organisations that have designed innovative packaging within each of these five manufacturing categories:

  • Food
  • Beverage
  • Health, beauty and wellness
  • Domestic and household
  • Labelling and decoration

There will be three special awards available:

  • Sustainable packaging design special award
  • Save food packaging design
  • Accessible packaing design

In addition there are three awards designed for people who have made specific contributions to the packaging industry.

These Individual Awards will include:

  • Young Packaging Professional of the Year
  • Industry Packaging Professional of the Year
  • The Packaging New Zealand Scholarship that will offer one person from New Zealand the opportunity to enrol in the Diploma in Packaging Technology course; an internationally recognised and accredited course.

The PIDA Awards are the exclusive award program for all Australia and New Zealand entries into the prestigious WorldStar Packaging Awards.

Packaging’s role in halving food waste by 2030

With Australian consumers throwing away around 3.1 million tonnes of edible food a year, and another 2.2 million tonnes disposed of by the commercial and industrial sector, along with a Federal Government National Food Waste Strategy to halve food waste that goes to landfill by 2030, it is time that everyone contributes to solving this issue.

As a part of the AIP’s commitment to minimising food waste, the Institute has a representative on the Department of the Environment and Energy National Food Waste Steering Committee. It is also a participant in the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre is a member of both the Save Food Initiative and of Friends of 12.3, as well as an active World Packaging Organisation Member in the Save Food Pavilion at Interpack.
The AIP is a long-standing supporter of Foodbank Australia, running an annual Christmas Hamper Packing Program in Queensland and recently introducing a warehouse packing day in Victoria for the wider industry.

The Institute is focused on education and training programs that can assist with minimising food waste and loss globally.

The AIP has developed training courses and awards programs that are focused on:
• The role of packaging in minimising food waste
• Save Food Packaging design
• Sustainable packaging design
• The role of lifecycle analysis in packaging design
The AIP has also been working on key criteria and guidelines for packaging technologists and designers to use as the standard for Save Food Packaging design.
Long-term objectives of the AIP are to:
• Encourage all packaging technologists and designers to use Save Food Packaging key criteria and guidelines across the globe. The key criteria includes “re-sealability, openability, improvement of barrier packaging and extension of shelf-life, portion control, better understanding of Best Before vs Use By dates; improved design to reduce warehouse and transport damages and losses; better use of active and intelligent packaging; and lifecycle assessments”.
• Ensure that all packaging technologists and designers are utilising lifecyle analysis tools within their Save Food Packaging framework. Today, there is a strong focus on the environmental aspects of food packaging to ensure that at the end of its life (after use of the product contained) that it can be reused, repurposed, recycled or composted.
• Encourage manufacturers to actively engage in designing innovative Save Food Packaging and communicating these initiatives to their customers and consumers.
• Recognise a range of Save Food Packaging innovations through the Packaging Innovation & Design (PIDA) Awards and the international WorldStar Packaging Award program.
• Showcase best practice award-winning save food packaging innovations across Australia and New Zealand.
• Contribute to consumer education and engagement projects to change the narrative around packaging’s roles in minimising food waste. Consumer education is needed to help them better understand the true role of food packaging: “protection, preservation and promotion of product, shelf-life extension, tamper resistance, barrier from external elements all the while ensuring safe delivery of food.”

The National Food Waste Strategy and the establishment of the Fight Food Waste CRC have for the first time enabled the bringing together of a range of like-minded industry professionals who are working collaboratively across the entire supply chain for a common goal: “Halving Food Waste by 2030”. Every business has a role to play.

Has your business developed a Fight Food Waste Strategy? Are you designing any Save Food Packaging? If so, what criteria are your packaging technologists using?

Are you ensuring that LCA is incorporated in your design tools? Have you enrolled your packaging technologists in the new training course, The Role of Packaging in Minimising Food Waste?

Plastic waste – why every gram counts

In my 30 years of HDPE plastic bottle manufacturing, I have become an expert in every aspect of this business. And this is not by chance, but a lot of hard work.

As I focus my efforts on the finite resource that is HDPE, I want to make the world aware of an important point: full-loop recycling is hard, and it is capital intensive. This doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t recycle –  in fact, we absolutely must. It is a priority in my world.

I believe one of the easiest and simplest ways to lessen waste is to reduce the weight of HDPE bottles by one gram. In many cases, a brand owner and a manufacturer can just agree to reduce the weight of HDPE plastic bottles by changing the specification with no resulting impact on the integrity of the bottle. It is just a change in documentation. If that is a little concerning, or for some reason makes you nervous, then go with half a gram – every bit will count in the end.

Success in weight reduction comes in the form of predictable results from known process inputs, and more importantly, having those known inputs in control.

The products that go inside the bottles are made using strict recipes and quality controls. For the HDPE bottle manufacturing process – extrusion blow moulding – it is the same.
Plastic bottles are made from a range of materials, and are an engineered part of the bottle – they must be seen as this until the day they are consumed and tossed into the recycling bin. Bottles that are produced with a high degree of repeatability and are proven on the filling line build confidence in the people who fill them. This confidence will be the trigger to a successful weight reduction project. And this may also build the confidence in brand owners to reduce the weight by even more than one gram.

Without the confidence of the team filling the bottles, anything that can potentially change the bottles performance characteristics will be fought against hard, and the end goal of reducing the weight by one gram won’t work.

Considering the billions of HDPE bottles that are made each year of just one gram of HDPE plastic is removed from even half of them, then we will have saved an extraordinary amount of energy to produce this plastic in the first place.

And let us not forget the extraordinary amount of product that will be saved from landfill, or the effort having to recycle it afterwards.

AIP takes sustainable packaging design course to New Zealand

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with Packaging New Zealand, will be taking their new “Introduction to Sustainable Packaging Design” half-day training course and Materials Recycling Facility (MRF) visit to Auckland on the February 13, 2019.

The course is designed to assist anyone who is responsible in their business to make packaging changes to meet ‘War on Waste’ questions, changes to retailer and consumer trends and behaviours; while not spending any more money at the end.

It will provide attendees a better understanding of the practical guidelines and criteria needed to design and develop sustainable packaging including the Sustainability Hierarchy of Reduce, Reuse then Recycle and the Circular Economy approach to packaging and the environment.

Discussions will also cover plastic, glass and metal packaging and their impact on the environment and whether the use of non-renewable resources, plant-based bioplastics, compostable and recycled materials and various tools can assist their business to understand the full life of packaging.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

This will involve the impact of ‘Food or Product Waste’.

Participants will be invited to bring with them a sample of their company’s packaging materials to use as a case study.

As part of the course, attendees will visit a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) to expose participants to the realities of a working MRF facilities, their equipment, limitation and material handling issues.

The participants will get an understanding of what is and is not separated out for possible recycling, and why. This is followed by understanding the next stage of the recycling process after the MRF, for example the current five material beneficiation processes.

Course objectives:

  1. To provide participants an understanding of the current environmental issues that are impacting the producers of packaging and the manufacturers and retailers of packaged product.
  2. To provide participants an understanding of sustainable packaging design and the practical design guidelines and approaches required in the packaging design process including End of Life (EoL) thinking.
  3. To provide participants with a better view of Best Practice Examples and Case Studies of award-winning Sustainable Packaging and Save Food Packaging innovations.

Who should attend?

If you are responsible for your business’s packaging design, performance or purchase specification, then you should attend. Packaging Designers, Technologists and Engineers, anyone responsible for Environmental Strategy Development, Marketing & Sales, Graphic Designers.

Presenter:

Ralph Moyle FAIP, CPP, education coordinator for AIP.

Moyle is an experienced food-packaging consultant with 40 years in the food processing industry and 20 year’s focused on packaging.

Through a unique range of senior management experiences in Packaging, Operations, Technical and Quality Assurance in large and medium FMCG businesses, Moyle has brought increased value to many organisations through the value of smarter packaging at less waste.

Moyle’s packaging knowledge has resulted in successful contemporary designs and material selections, improved shelf life, lower material costs, shorter supply chains and environmentally-friendly selections that have provided greater economic value.

Moyle is a past National President of the AIP, a Certified Packaging Professional (CPP) and a Fellow of the AIP.

Foodbank shows behind-the-scenes process with volunteer program

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) has continued its long-standing partnership with Foodbank by introducing a new volunteering day in Victoria, which allows members to find out how the organisation operates.

The first day held in late October and the AIP Foodbank Warehouse Volunteering Program will continue in 2019.

It allows members and their colleagues to work directly with Foodbank Victoria to help the Yarraville Warehouse pick and pack on-line orders and mixed grocery boxes.

The program provides the opportunity to better understand how Foodbank works and is a combination of picking and packing of on-line food orders and packing mixed grocery boxes.

READ: AIP president explains biodegradable and compostable packaging

The on-line orders have been placed by many of the 470 charity partners who look after the thousands of Victorians currently experiencing food insecurity.

The mixed groceries items are donated by school students, community groups, clubs and corporate organisations who run food drives to provide the ingredients for the food boxes.

Their charity partners are able to order these boxes which they then pass on to those families or individuals who need that extra help with grocery items.

The volunteering program provides vital work supporting struggling Victorians.

Members have supported numerous charities across the state by packing their food orders, packing around 1600 boxes of cans and also packing a range of mixed vegetables for Foodbank Victoria.

Together the AIP team packed a 21,459kg – equivalent to about 38,256 meals for the community.

That is the equivalent of feeding a family of four, three meals a day for about nine years.

AIP will continue this program in 2019 and will be announcing new dates shortly and everyone is invited to join.

AIP president explains biodegradable and compostable packaging

Biodegradable and compostable packaging are not interchangeable. Dr Carol Kilcullen-Lawrence, the national president of the Australia Institute of Packaging (AIP) explains why.

Compostable and biodegradable – two terms that are often used interchangeably, but in reality actually mean very different things.

In light of the recent Australian Environment Ministers announcement that 100 per cent of packaging in Australia will be reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025 we need to better understand how we can really achieve this and how different this target is compared to the packaging waste streams that are in place today.

The first step is to understand the difference between compostable and biodegradable packaging.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

Everything will degrade over time but true biodegradation occurs through a biochemical process, with the aid of enzymes produced by naturally occurring microorganisms, both in the presence and absence of oxygen i.e. aerobic or anaerobic, without leaving behind any toxins, yielding only carbon dioxide, water and humus or biomass.

Biodegradable packaging is either completely or partially derived from a renewable source – like paper or starch – or, if it is petroleum based, is specifically engineered with the aid of additives, to decompose in the natural environment. Such additives change the chemical composition of the plastic.

While this does not affect its manufacturing, use or shelf life, such that it differs functionally from other plastics, it is significant at the end of life.

A biodegradable plastic will be considered a contaminant in the plastics recycling stream, as on being exposed to moisture and appropriate microorganisms, the biodegradation process will commence.

Compostable packaging has an organic origin, like sugar cane, bamboo or paper, and can broadly be classified into two types:

1. one that which will compost in a home compost; and

2. one that requires an industrial compost facility.

Industrial composting can cope with a wider range of compostable products as it involves pre-processing – where materials are ground and chipped down into smaller pieces, and in addition, industrial composting provides the higher temperatures needed for more efficient break down.

Home composting takes place at much lower temperatures and over an extended time frame, which can typically go up to a year, compared to a matter of weeks for industrial composting. And what people and organisations need to realise is that there is a different set of standards for materials suitable for home composting, which is governed by Vincotte a Belgium-based certification organisation.

While not currently available in all regions of Australia, industrial composting facilities are becoming increasingly widespread with many more councils and private companies providing bins where food scraps and compostable packaging can be disposed of within existing green waste collection services.

Known as FOGO, participating councils are considering potentially reducing landfill collections to fortnightly, allowing FOGO collections to become weekly. However, most councils also know that there will need to be significant consumer education to ensure the right types of compostable and biodegradable packaging are disposed of in such services.

One of the ideal situations to utilise compostable and biodegradable packaging is at public events where the inputs to the waste stream can be controlled by those at the arenas.

In such situations if all food packaging is manufactured from compostable organic sources and biodegradable plastics, then disposal facilities that capture this with the food waste will allow the packaging to be industrially composted together.

This is an ideal solution as many types of biodegradable and compostable packaging cannot be recycled, hence cannot be placed in kerbside recycling. It would be impossible for a consumer to identify the difference between a biodegradable PLA plastic container with a visually identical petroleum-based polymer one.

The move to biodegradable or compostable packaging is real, and with a 2025 target, now is the time to identify not only the most suitable sustainable solutions to suit each product, but to also ensure that the packaging waste streams have the capabilities to manage this change.   

Businesses learn about sustainable packaging that minimises food waste

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) lead training and education programs as a part of FoodTech Packtech, which was held in Auckland last week.

Over the three days, in September, AIP provided discussions on key issues that are challenging the food and beverage industries.

Discussions included fighting food waste, save food and sustainable packaging designs, the issues within end-of-life recycling facilities and a better understanding of lifecycle analysis.

AIP had a full house for the new half-day training course on the role of packaging in minimising food waste with attendees including staff from Frucor, Fonterra, Danone, and  Multivac.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

The course provided participants with an introduction to the seriousness of food waste in Australia and New Zealand and how we can all make a difference as team members of the product-packaging design process to this issue.

It also covered packaging design criteria for best-practice save food packaging design developments that should be considered.

Key takeaways from the attendees included a new focus on what a business needs to do to improve its packaging design.

Businesses gained a better understanding of the true benefits that packaging plays in minimising food waste and a better awareness that packaging does have a role to play in relation to food loss.

Key takeaways from the attendees of the fighting food waste, save food and sustainable packaging design seminar included gaining a better view of the current issues in sustainable packaging design.

One attendee said that once packaging is designed, businesses need to start looking at the next step in improvements as the journey never ends.

AIP had a joint stand with Packaging New Zealand that showcased all the 2018 Packaging Innovation and Design Award winners for both Australia and New Zealand and the WorldStar Packaging Awards.

The Australian Institute of Packaging will be a partner of the next FoodTech PackTech event in 2020.

Australian Institute of Packaging joins Save Food initiative to fight food waste

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) has joined the Save Food initiative as part of its commitment to the United Nations sustainable development goal and the national food waste strategy in Australia.

Save Food is a joint initiative of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, the United Nations Environment Programme, Messe Düsseldorf, and interpack – the leading global trade fair for packaging and processes.

The goal is to fight global food waste and loss through a global alliance of all stakeholders.

Messe Düsseldorf processing and packaging global portfolio director, Bernd Jablonowski, said the role of packaging in reducing food waste is crucial.

READ: AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

“The Save Food packaging awards have already proven that our industry has innovative ideas to emphasise that role. Being part of the Save Food Initiative communicates the industry’s potential to the relevant stakeholders and encourages new projects and ideas to reduce food loss and waste,” said Jablonowski.

AIP executive director Nerida Kelton said the institute launched the Save Food Packaging Design awards three years ago, in conjunction with the World Packaging Organisation and the Save Food program to encourage improved food packaging design that minimises food waste.

“Australia was the first country in the world to accept the World Packaging Organisation invitation to initiate this award with Australia and New Zealand winners showcased at the international interpack trade exhibition in Germany during May, 2017.

“In May 2018 two of the award winners showcased at interpack went on to receive the Gold and Bronze Save Food Packaging Design Special Awards from the WorldStar Packaging Awards.

“The winning Save Food Packaging designs include advances in extension of shelf life, portion control, improved use-by-date information and on-pack communication, openability and resealability to help prevent wastage of packaged foods,” said Kelton.

“The Australian Institute of Packaging wants to encourage global industry support to ensure the widespread implementation of these world-leading innovations. It will make a huge difference if improved Save Food Packaging design becomes standard criteria for all manufacturers globally,” she said.

“The packaging industry needs a global platform like the Save Food initiative that can accelerate positive change. We can’t have a fragmented approach if we expect to see necessary improvements in packaging design that minimises food waste,” said Kelton.

 

AIP will run food waste and packaging seminars at FoodTech PackTech

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP), in conjunction with Packaging New Zealand, will be running a two-hour seminar on fighting food waste, save food packaging and sustainable packaging design on the 20th of September at FoodTech PackTech 2018.

Seminar – Part one: Fighting food waste and the role of packaging in minimizing food waste. Will solving New Zealand’s food waste problem help save hunger in the country?  

More than 122,500 tonnes of food waste, or the equivalent to $872 million worth of edible food, is thrown away every year in New Zealand.
The avoidable food waste could feed 50,000 and 80,000 people a year.
There is not only a social imperative to solve this problem, but also an economic one.
This seminar helps people find out how they can play a role in minimising food waste.
KiwiHarvest CEO Deborah Manning will speak at the seminar.

Fight food waste cooperative research centre: New collaboration to tackle Australia’s food waste issue.  

In April 2018 the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) received a $30m grant from the Australian Government’s CRC program.
The Fight Food Waste CRC involves 60 participants from around Australia and overseas, who collectively raised $103m in addition to the $30m from the CRC Program.
This initiative will be an Australia-first bringing industry, government and research bodies collectively and collaboratively together to tackle the food waste problem in this country. At this seminar, people can find out how New Zealand companies can get involved in the CRC program and how they can roll out their own waste strategy.

The important role that packaging plays in minimising food waste.

While the primary function of packaging is to protect its contents, the function of packaging to reduce food waste is rarely discussed.
The connection between packaging design and food waste needs to be discussed more openly.
People can find out how packaging companies, food manufacturers and retailers can make a difference as team members of the product-packaging design process to this issue.
People can learn more about save food packaging design innovations that have come from Australia and New Zealand and understand how designing packaging to save food actually saves food.

Speakers include Dr Karli Verghese PhD, FAIP, Reducing Supply Chain Losses research program leader and Lars Ljung, special projects coordinator, Planet Protector Packaging.

Seminar ­­– Part two: Moving towards sustainable packaging by 2025.  

Every day on the news there is a new article about banning single use plastics, multinational companies pledging to move towards 100 per cent sustainable packaging, plastic free aisles and more.
This discussion will help you to better understand the current conversations in the industry, changes to regulations, how it all relates to you and what tools are available to move towards sustainable packaging.
Hear about the Australasian Recycling Label, the PREP tool and from award-winning packaging experts on how to incorporate reduce, reuse, repurpose, recycle and the circular economy approach into all of your future packaging design.

Speakers include Sharon Humphreys, executive director of Packaging New Zealand and Alejandra Laclette, recycling label program manager at Planet Ark Environmental Foundation.

AIP Half-Day Training Course alongside FoodTech PackTech 2018:

AIP is also offering a half-day training course as an additional event at FoodTech PackTech 2018.
AIP has developed a new half-day training course on the Role of Packaging in Minimising Food Waste with all of industry invited to attend.

Australian Institute of Packaging to introduce sustainable packaging design course

The Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) will be launching its new Introduction to Sustainable Packaging Design half-day training course.

The course is designed to assist anyone who is responsible for making packaging changes in their business to meet ‘war on waste’ questions, changes to retailer and consumer trends and behaviours, while not spending any more money.

The course will provide attendees a better understanding of the practical guidelines and criteria needed to design and develop sustainable packaging.

This includes the sustainability hierarchy of reduce, reuse then recycle, and the circular economy approach to packaging and the environment.

READ: AIP to discuss consumer & environmental trends in plastics

Discussions will also cover plastic, glass and metal packaging and their impact on the environment.

It will also cover whether the use of non-renewable resources, plant-based bioplastics, compostable and recycled materials and various tools can assist businesses to understand the full life of packaging.

Participants will be invited to bring with them a sample of their company’s packaging materials to use as a case study.

As part of the course, attendees will visit a material recovery facility to expose participants to the realities of a working these facilities, their equipment, limitation and material handling issues.

The visit to the material recovery facility will take place on the 17th October in Melbourne.

The participants will get an understanding of what is and is not separated out for possible recycling, and why.

This is followed by understanding the next stage of the recycling process after the material recovery facility.

The course aims to provide participants an understanding of the current environmental issues that are impacting the producers of packaging and the manufacturers and retailers of packaged product.

It will provide participants an understanding of sustainable packaging design and the practical design guidelines and approaches required in the packaging design process including end of life thinking.

It will also provide participants with a better view of best practice examples and case studies of award-winning sustainable packaging and save food packaging innovations.

People who are responsible for a business’s packaging design, performance or purchase specification, are encouraged to attend.

This includes packaging designers, technologists and engineers, anyone responsible for environmental strategy development, marketing and sales, and graphic designers.

Presenters include AIP education coordinator Ralph Moyle.

Moyle is an experienced food-packaging consultant, with 40 years in the food processing industry and 20 years focus on packaging.

 

Australian Institute of Packaging expands its food charity reach into Victoria

For more than eight years, the has Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) been a supporter of Foodbank across Australia through the Queensland hamper program.

It is now pleased to also introduce the Victorian Warehousing Volunteer Program. 

The AIP has spent its Christmas Party every year for the past seven years with a twist.

The members pack Foodbank hampers for people who need some assistance from their community at Christmas time.

READ: Woolworths Ltd packaging technologist wins top AIP award

In 2017, more than 150 people packed 1,100 hampers for Foodbank to provide to those in need during the holiday season.

The hampers included 800 family hampers and 300 ladies’ packs. The total valuing more than $73,000 worth of items that were either donated, or the funds raised for, by the Association and the wider industry

Over the last seven years, the team has packed 6,500 hampers to the value of close to $730,000 for people in need and they look forward to packing even more hampers in 2018.

All of industry is invited to donate items or funds to the hampers, or attend and participate at Eagle Farm Racetrack on the 7th of December 2018.

AIP asks for all those in the industry to join its new Warehouse Volunteering Program; either as an individual, with staff and colleagues, or with families.

AIP will work directly with Foodbank Victoria to book in some days where volunteers can visit the Yarraville Warehouse and help pick and pack on-line orders and mixed grocery boxes.

The day will start with a formal introduction on how Foodbank Victoria works and information on their charity partners.

The program will provide volunteers the opportunity to better understand how Foodbank works and will be a combination of picking and packing of on-line food orders and packing mixed grocery boxes.

The on-line orders have been placed by many of the 470 charity partners who look after the thousands of Victorians currently experiencing food insecurity.

The mixed groceries items
are donated by school students, community groups, clubs and corporate organisations who run food drives to provide the ingredients for the food boxes.

Their charity partners are able to order these boxes, which they then pass on to those families or individuals who need that extra help with grocery items.

Each volunteer will have the opportunity to work in both areas.

Shifts would be for four to five hours.

As a part of its commitment to the National Food Waste Strategy and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 12:3, AIP
is focused on providing long-term education and training on the role of packaging in minimising food waste, save food packaging, sustainable packaging and lifecycle analysis.

AIP also has a representative on the Department of the Environment and Energy National Food Waste Steering Committee and is a contributor of the Fight Food Waste Cooperative Research Centre.

Australian Institute of Packaging supports newly-launched digital print centre

A new digital print centre at Holmesglen will provide quality industry training.

Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) members and industry colleagues are heading to the newly-launched digital print centre on the 5th of September.

Located at the Chadstone campus, the digital centre will help contribute to increased learning opportunities to the Institute’s printing courses.

Printing is a global industry using the most advanced digital technologies alongside traditional print processes.

READ: AIP to discuss consumer & environmental trends in plastics

Holmesglen courses provide the skills to work in this highly competitive industry.

From conventional forms to ink-jet technologies, large format printing, digital printing and packaging applications and digital label printing, the printed form remains highly relevant in a digital world.

It will be led by industry-experts such as Andrew Readman – an AIP lecturer in the Master of Food and Packaging Innovation course.

Holmesglen is leading the way for future generations of printing and design professionals.

Attendees will be able to see demonstrations of the Sinapse computer simulation presses, lithography, heatset web, coldest web, flexography, central impression and corrugated board.

People can also find out about live prints to the range of Konica Minolta digital presses, EFI workstation RIPS and HP wide format inkjets.

A demonstration of Holmesglen’s online learning portal, Brightspace, and courses are also offered.

 

Woolworths Ltd packaging technologist wins top AIP award

At an AIP NSW meeting in Sydney earlier this month in July, Aleah Back was awarded the prestigious Harry Lovell award for academic excellence.

In 2014, Aleah Back, a qualified packaging technologist who is currently employed as Quality Specialist – Fresh – In-Store Bakery at Woolworths Limited, was awarded the APPMA Annual Scholarship to undertake the Diploma in Packaging Technology.

In 2016 she graduated achieving her Diploma in record time and excelled in her final exam results.

Subsequently, the AIP Education Committee has decided to formally acknowledge her outstanding achievements as a student of the Diploma in Packaging Technology by awarding Aleah the Harry Lovell Award.

The Harry Lovell Award recognises outstanding achievement in the examinations leading to the Diploma in Packaging Technology and has not been awarded since 2013.

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